New law could solve Moors Murder mystery of where Ian Brady buried Keith Bennett

News

A change in the law could finally solve the mystery of where Moors Murderer Ian Brady buried his final victim.

Home Secretary Priti Patel is reportedly planning to give police warrants to seize material that could locate murder victims’ remains.

The new law could be used to search two briefcases belonging to Brady that have so far remain sealed since his death four years ago.

The family of Keith Bennett, 12, the third victim of Brady and twisted accomplice Myra Hindley, believe those briefcases could solve the mystery of where his body is buried.

Along with Hindley, Brady tortured, sexually assaulted and murdered five children between 1963 and 1965.

The evil pair then buried their victims’ broken bodies on the edge of the windy open spaces close to Saddleworth, near Greater Manchester.

But the remains of Keith have never been found and his mother Winnie died in 2012 without knowing fully what had happened to her son.

Before he died on May 15, 2017, Brady ordered that two locked Samsonite briefcases should be taken from his bedside and handed to his solicitor.

He had insisted they should not be opened until after his death.

Now, the Daily Mail reports that a new law brought by Home Secretary Priti Patel could lead to the opening of those briefcases and yielding more clues that would point to where the child victim was buried.

The forthcoming Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill, if passed, would introduce measures allowing investigators warrants for material that could reveal the location of a murder victim’s remains.

Detectives on the case have so far been unable to examine documents contained in two combination-locked briefcases left by Brady after he died in 2017.

Miss Patel met Keith’s younger brother Alan, now 64, this week to discuss the plans.

He has long believed Brady’s paperwork may contain vital clues about where his brother was buried on Saddleworth Moor.

“Keith’s story will be known to many, but what may not be known is the struggle which our family has gone through to try to seek closure,’ Mr Bennett told the Mail.

“The Bill is large and wide ranging and will change the laws in a major way regarding police investigations.”

Brady took his evil secrets to the grave as he died in “distress” gasping for air, and an inquest in September 2017 gave hope of new clues to locate the body of Keith Bennett, with the revelation of the briefcases.

Terry Kilbride, 62, whose brother John was another of Brady’s five victims, previously said: “There must be something in those briefcases for him to go to those lengths to hide them away.

“It’s all the hope we have for finding Keith.”

And Terry West, 66, brother of victim Lesley Ann Downey, added: “I would like to know what’s in those briefcases.

“Fingers crossed there might be ­something that would finally help us to find Keith’s body.”